Refine Results
View Preview
First Amendment issues come to the fore in an unusual way in "The Works Speak for Themselves." Alanna Wolff and Jeff Byrd are called in when works of art begin to talk, make chit-chat, and sound off! This issue was produced to support the Comic Book Legal Defense Fund. Note: This issue contains the first appearance of Desmond, the new receptionist, in a regular issue of Supernatural Law. Pinup art by Rick Geary, Roger Langridge, Stephen Notley, Christina “Smudge” Hanson, and Shaenon Garrity/Andrew Farago was donated to the CLBDF.
→ more
View Preview
This issue contains two stories. In “Werewolves . . . and the Women Who Love Them,” Dr. Fill’s special guest is “Diana X,” a woman who became obsessed with and pursued a werewolf, who is one of Wolff & Byrd’s clients. Meanwhile, Wolff & Byrd are at the ancestral home of another client, Christopher Leach, which segues into the second story, “Stakeout.” Leach is a fifth-generation vampire who has been “outed” by a girl he dated who claims he harassed her. Now he is holed up in his house and the press is after him for a story; only Wolff & Byrd stand between him and the hoards surrounding the house. Note: The issue has pinups by Randall Kirby, Erica Vess, Hilary Barta, and Rick Parker.
→ more
View Preview
Fifth-generation vampire Christopher Leach has become a Hollywood celebrity, as he is in talks with Quagmire Pictures to star in his own biopic. Wolff & Byrd are in Los Angeles to negotiate his contract, and they are worried about the naivety of their client. Chris takes young starlet Amber out to a swanky place for dinner, where he receives a cryptic warning from a mysterious waiter. When Amber’s body is found in the ladies’ room with two puncture wounds to the neck, Chris panics and flees the scene by stealing a car from the valet. What follows is a slow-speed police chase on L.A. freeways, a showdown at a cemetery, and a Hollywood ending! Note: This issue contains pinups by Jeff Harris, S. S. Crompton, Brian Clopper, and Russ Maharas, and a photo of Forry Ackerman reading Supernatural Law.
→ more
View Preview
While in Los Angeles, Wolff & Byrd are asked by old college friend Reuben Chaver to serve as co-counsel in a case involving a haunted house. They are representing Cindy Schneider, a realtor who sold an expensive old Hollywood mansion to nouveau riche movie producers Frank Furlan and Gill Paggio, whose big success is the low-budget slasher film Flayed. The two men are alleging that Cindy misrepresented the house as being haunted by movie great Bennett Shawn, who originally owned the house and had died in it back in 1953. They say there is indeed a ghost, but it’s not Shawn, and they feel ripped off. Interspersed in the issue are four different representations of “Wolff & Byrd: The Movie,” all based on true pitches Batton received from Hollywood executives. Note: The movie sequences were drawn by Russell Calabrese, Trevor Nielson, and Melissa Uran. Pinup art was provided by Bill Galvan, Pat Lewis, Dave Garcia, and Mark Wheatley.
→ more
View Preview
Wolff and Byrd have a change of venue when they travel to Tromaville to defend none other than the Toxic Avenger! But can they prevail in a courtroom presided over by Judge Lloyd Kaufman? Note: This issue was authorized by Lloyd Kaufman and Troma.
→ more
View Preview
'Beware the Creatures of the Night: They Have Lawyers!' This is the very first issue of the Wolff & Byrd/Supernatural Law comic book series. In this story, "Herbert Has Risen from the Grave," attorneys Alanna Wolff and Jeff Byrd represent a couple who have used the fabled monkey's paw to make a wish that goes terribly wrong. This issue also introduces a long-running W&B client: Sodd, the Thing Called It.
→ more
View Preview
In this second issue of the Wolff & Byrd/Supernatural Law series, Alanna Wolff and Jeff Byrd encounter the "Curse of the Werehouse!" Tom and Kim Curtis live in a house that becomes haunted every full moon. Tom's former boos sues when the house "assaults" him after he comes to dinner. Tom is a skeptic who pooh-poohs supernatural explanations for the haunted house. Kim calls Jeff Byrd because they used to work together in Chase Hawkins' office early in Jeff's career; he had a crush on her, which is rekindled during this case. Nosey neighbors report the strange goings-on at the Curtis house to the authorities, and it isn't too long before the Bureau of Firearms and Drugs (BFD) gets into the act-just in time for the next full moon.
→ more
View Preview
This is the first W and B issue to consist of several short stories. In 'The Zombies Strike at Midnight,' the owner of a novelty company goes into Wade's Haitian Hut, a bar near the courthouse, and complains about the fact that the zombies he employs to make his specialty voodoo dolls have gone on strike; the zombies of course are represented by W&B. In 'Court of Public Opinion,' Sodd is back as jury selection is under way. On the courtroom steps, the press abandon W and B and Sodd when they spot attorney Chase Hawkins and his client, supermodel Dawn Devine. In 'Mavis,' the secretary ventures out onto the street to find that the real world can be scarier than the firm's monster-filled offices. In 'Things That Go Bump In The Night,' it's just Jeff and Alanna alone in the office in the wee hours. Finally, in 'The Man Who Broke The Laws of Gravity (and Landed in Court),' W and B represent Lowell M. Rose, a consultant to Blackwood Museum who translates an ancient Tibetan scroll on levitation and finds himself up in the air; he sues when the museum fires him.
→ more
View Preview
This issue: 'A Host of Horrors!' The Bier-Meister is a 1950s-style horror host whose career is revived as a host for a special on the Eek! Channel (EC) all-horror network. Arrested for graverobbing in an incident involving the grave of Dr. Forrest Bertrum, "Bierie" is exonerated but then loses the hosting job due to pressure on the network from a parents' group, the Children's Movement Activist Association. W&B represent the Bier-Meister's suit against a local county for banning EC network, raising the issue of free speech versus "protecting the children." Meanwhile, Sodd signs a deal for British horror novelist Niles Pib (based on Neil Gaiman) to write his life story.
→ more
View Preview
In "The Model Client," Dawn DeVine is a supermodel trying to get out of her contract with the Greatbody Agency and its Svengali-like owner, Jake Panache. She's been having an affair with her attorney, Chase Hawkins, who says he can no longer represent her because of the conflict of interest. So why does he refer her to Wolff & Byrd? Let's just say some magic spells are involved, and Dawn winds up in a condition that makes it impossible for her to keep modeling. The plot twists and turns before reaching its "fairy tale" ending.
→ more
1 - 10 of 17 results