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Like best friends who've been together year after year, through thick and thin, Cathy and her adoring public have created a solid and stable relationship. Faithful readers count on their cartoon heroine to tell it like it is, whether the subject's relationships, shopping, or parental responsibilities. In Shoes: Chocolate for the Feet, women immediately comprehend this connection between two of Cathy's downfalls-food and shopping. Cathy continues to battle the bulge, constantly losing the tug-of-war between her thin clothes and a well-stocked refrigerator. Millions of women have hilariously identified with Cathy's struggles with the four basic guilt groups: food, love, mother, and career.
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"The comic-strip character Cathy, one of America's most famous single career women, finally got married to her hapless longtime boyfriend, Irving--and on Valentine's Day, no less. It's the end of an era-or was it?" --USA Today "YES." Rarely has one word, one positive response, resonated so loudly from the world's comic pages. But when leading lady Cathy finally took the plunge--after nearly 30 interminable years!--and accepted boyfriend Irving's marriage proposal, the occasion certainly deserved notice among Cathy fans around the globe. The Wedding of Cathy and Irving captures all the fun, magic, and--yes--the nerve-racking overanalyzing that filled the Cathy strips leading up to the big decision and the big day itself. This collection features some of the couple's most memorable moments from throughout their long relationship, but the spotlight shines most on the year that included the unexpected "ring find," the proposal, the "YES," and the frenetic wedding plans that Cathy and Mom both endure and perpetuate. The longest courtship in cartoon page history came to an end on February 5, 2005. But as The Wedding of Cathy and Irving shows, nothing is quite that simple in Cathy's world. Whether she's pondering pastor possibilities or worrying wedding dress selections to death, Cathy is unequalled in capturing the conundrums of modern women everywhere. It's all Cathy, through and through.
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Charles Schulz’s Peanuts is one of the most timeless and beloved comic strips ever. Now AMP! helps carry on that legacy with new collections of Peanuts classics focused around topics sure to resonate with middle-grade readers. Second in the series is Charlie Brown and Friends. Whether it's the curious relationship between a bird, Woodstock, and a dog, Snoopy, or the never-ending crush that Peppermint Patty has on Charlie Brown, the gang's interactions are what make Peanuts resonate with kids. First published in 1950, the classic Peanuts strip now appears in more than 2,200 newspapers in 75 countries in 25 languages. Phrases such as “security blanket” and “good grief,” which originated in the Peanuts world, are now part of the global vernacular, and images of Charles Schulz’s classic characters—Charlie Brown kicking the football, Lucy leaning over Schroeder’s piano—are now universally recognized. Together these books will introduce a new generation of kids to the lovable cast in time for the new animated Peanuts movie, which hits theaters in 2015!
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Put me in, Coach! The Peanuts gang is ready to play ball in this collection of baseball-themed cartoons. Some of the most popular Peanuts moments happen on the field and they're gathered here for a season full of enjoyment. As manager of the endlessly losing team, Charlie Brown soldiers on to keep his team's spirits up, while being constantly blown off the pitching mound in a clothes-exploding fashion. It doesn't help that his catcher is a musician by nature or that his shortstop is a dog. Not to mention that center-fielder Lucy can't keep her mouth shut long enough to know what's going on in the game! Put them all together and you get a game plan for laughs! First published in 1950, the classic Peanuts strip now appears in more than 2,200 newspapers in 75 countries in 25 languages. Phrases such as “security blanket” and “good grief,” which originated in the Peanuts world, are now part of the global vernacular, and images of Charles Schulz’s classic characters — Charlie Brown kicking the football, Lucy leaning over Schroeder’s piano — are now universally recognized.
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In Dan Reynolds's world, nerds play birthday party games like Pin The Tail on the Jackass. Women at the Maximum Insecurity Prison wonder if uniform stripes make them look fat. Tiny tater tots with their eyes all aglow find it hard to sleep at night. Reynolds draws a wild and wacky world that keeps everyone howling with laughter. In Christmas Meltdown, Reynolds pays tribute to the Yuletide season. With his offbeat humor and hilarious style, Reynolds provides a perfect gift for everyone who wants to celebrate with major doses of quirky fun and clever frivolity.
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Is your face suffering from a lack of exercise? Readers rely on John McPherson's Close to Home cartoon to contort their facial muscles into an unstoppable grin each day. Not even Botox can stop you from smiling at this latest collection of Close to Home. How do you measure a cartoon's popularity? The true measure of a comic panel's popularity is how often it is posted on a refrigerator, cubicle, break room bulletin board, or office door. By that standard, Close to Home wins the comic panel popularity contest hands down. Close to Home captures the humor in all facets of life. From home to hospitals, from classrooms to courtrooms, from boardrooms to backyards--there's a Close to Home panel that hits us where we live and work and play. A Million Little Pieces of Close to Home features hilarious panels first published in newspapers in the year 2000, the year of the Y2K scare that never materialized. Of course, that's just the kind of thing you'd expect from a Close to Home world.
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Cartoonist John McPherson’s comics may be close to home, but thank your lucky stars that his erratic characters haven’t made themselves too comfortable in your home. McPherson’s ode to everyday life is punctuated with the off-the-wall personalities who can turn any normal occurrence into something ridiculous. The only way to read these cartoons and their comical characters—from naive new parents to devious toddlers—is to expect the unexpected. Close to Home debuted in 50 newspapers in 1992 after McPherson left his engineering job to become a full-time cartoonist, and today the comic strip runs in nearly 700 newspapers worldwide. His characters are regularly confronted with everyday dilemmas, including parent-teacher conferences, diaper changes, NS spousal disagreements, and their responses are always cleverly unpredictable. The situations are somehow both outlandish yet relatable, and anyone is sure to burst out in laughter at this original e-book collection of all of Close to Home’s boldest and best comical takes on parenting.
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Start with an everyday occurrence, add several helpings of absurdity, a few cups of silliness, and a dash of sickness and you get Close to Home. The goofy people and brilliant humor of this single-panel strip have put smiles on the faces of readers. This kooky collection, Close to Home Exposed, captures the hilarity of some of its best cartoon panels. As the comic's name suggests, Close to Home provides humor that's comfortable and familiar; yet the strip also has a palpable element of danger or nonsense. Topics vary widely, from health care and parenting to car repairs and shopping. But whether it's addressing dating or death--or just as likely, dating and death--Close to Home always delivers the off-center laughs its readers have come to expect. "Close to Home is always a scream, and I love the goofy people that you draw. Truth is, I work with a lot of these folks." --Tom D. "Where do you come up with these comics'! They are totally stupendous and are a big part of my stupid and nauseating life. You're the best!" --Sleepless in New York "Every day you make me laugh!! THANK YOU! THANK YOU! THANK YOU!" --An Online Fan
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Where there is stress, there is humor." --John McPherson * Close to Home, syndicated by Universal uClick, lampoons the best of popular culture one controversy at a time. Everything I Need to Know I Learned on Jerry Springer: A Close to Home Collection is a Close to Home collection. Creator John McPherson's sardonic wit creates an innocent hullabaloo with the Center for Nursing Advocacy and earns the accolades of Leavenworth Federal Detention Center's inmate #19108045. * McPherson's mastery is elevating the mundane to the magnificent. Scenes of societal sloth, coworker conundrums, dysfunctional discord, and medical malpractice become achingly funny when sketched by his pen.
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Ferociously Close to Home delivers McPherson's trademark take on the absurdities of everyday life. To say that his solutions to these perplexing situations is 'out there' is an understatement. Consider Gina, who decides a branding iron will be the ideal memory aid for her birthday date-challenged husband. And poor Lanny, whose treadmill session is interrupted when he inadvertently triggers the health club's offensive odor alarm. McPherson has long walked the line between grotesque and goofy. But somehow, his figures with big noses and bulging eyes connect with readers with a surefire magnetic precision. Whether it's health care or parenting, dating or car repairs, Close to Home delivers McPherson's warped world without fail.
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