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Fantasy
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Does size matter? Is bigger better? That’s no small question to Tom Little—the circus midget with giant dreams. Tom may be king of the midgets, but he’s got far grander ambitions—to become the muscleman at the top, the ringmaster. Now, drawing on some dark ancient secrets and mystic texts, he’s about to get his wish. Imagine a pint-sized Mickey Rooney on steroids, trading up into a body like Burt Lancaster’s. Then imagine paying the biggest price of all…. Assuming another man’s identity, Tom discovers he must also take on his sins, debts, and enemies. He may be living large—but now there are those who want to make him pay for the big man’s sins. Throughout his young life Hubbard was fascinated and intrigued by mysticism and magic. From an old Blackfoot Indian medicine man in Montana to the last living magician descendant of Kublai Khan in China, from the Chamorro natives of Guam to voodoo displays in Haiti, he absorbed information and insight wherever he could—putting it all to marvelous use in stories like this. Also includes The Last Drop, an astounding tale of a New York bartender who mixes some very magical drinks—to amazing effect. “Unexpected twists…keep you guessing as to what will happen next.” —SFsite.com
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Things are disappearing. Parts of buildings, parts of people, parts of the whole world-they’re here today, gone tomorrow. Old Shellback-a character as crazy-smart as Christopher Lloyd in Back to the Future-thinks he needs glasses. But all he really has to do is open his eyes . . . and see the light. Or so says George Smiley-otherwise known as the Messiah. George claims that the reason things are vanishing is because he wants them to go away. He has no more use for the world . . . and so it goes. Say goodbye. But Old Shellback has a different idea, and since he is the most stubborn man in the universe, you might want to hear him out. What’s Shellback’s idea? That two can play at this game. While George is making this world disappear, Old Shellback will make another one appear. Join him on an amazing odyssey-as he heads back to a future of his own making. By the spring of 1938, Hubbard’s stature as a writer was well established. As author and critic Robert Silverberg puts it: he had become a "master of the art of narrative." Hubbard’s editors urged him to apply his gift for succinct characterization, original plot, deft pacing and imaginative action to a genre that was new, and essentially foreign, to him-science fiction and fantasy. The rest is Sci-Fi history. Also includes the Science Fiction adventures, A Can of Vacuum, in which a practical joke on a space station proves that a good sense of humor is timeless, and 240,000 Miles Straight Up, the thrilling story of a race to the moon . . . and the one man who may be able to save the earth from Armageddon."
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Farmer Eben Smith heads off to the big city to trade his wagonload of produce. But he barters a lot more than goods after he stumbles across a strange crossroads in time, bargains with different cultures in alternate realities, and accidentally wreaks havoc and chaos in each.
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